Fever in the afternoon only

If you have a fever when you get home in the afternoon, but it doesn’t get any worse, it’s probably not a serious problem.

However, if you have a fever that gets worse over time, or you have other symptoms, it’s best to have a doctor check it out.

More information about the COVID-19 virus and other viruses

How to help stop the spread of the COVID-19 coronavirus?

COVID-19 is spreading rapidly in the United States. Here are some ways you can help stop it.

If you have symptoms of COVID-19, stay home and away from others. Stay home and avoid contact with people who are sick. Avoiding these activities can help prevent the spread of COVID-19.

Avoid crowds and close contact with people. If you must go out, wear a mask and practice social distancing.

If you’re at a restaurant or other public place, wear a mask and follow the tips above. If you’re in a group setting, have a plan to leave.

If you have a fever or other symptoms of COVID-19, contact your doctor.

If you have a fever, and you have symptoms of COVID-19, call your doctor. They’ll talk to you about what you should do next.

You can also call the CDC’s COVID-19 hotline at 1800822889.

If you’re experiencing symptoms of COVID-19 and think you might have been exposed to the coronavirus, call your doctor right away.

If you’ve been exposed to the coronavirus, you should get tested for COVID-19. If you test positive, you can expect to be isolated from others for at least 7 days to 10 days.

If you’ve been exposed to the coronavirus, you should go to an emergency room, urgent care clinic, or hospital.

What to do if you’re exposed to the coronavirus?

If you’re exposed to the coronavirus, you should isolate yourself from others and contact your doctor.

You might have the coronavirus if you’ve been in close contact with someone who has it, such as:

Close contact means being in the same room, or within 6 feet of someone who has the virus.

Close contact can include being in the same car or other enclosed space as someone who has the virus for an extended period of time.

You can protect yourself by:

  • Washing your hands for at least 20 seconds
  • Avoiding touching your eyes, nose, and mouth with unwashed hands
  • Avoiding close contact with people who are sick
  • Avoiding contact with surfaces that have been contaminated with the coronavirus
  • Avoiding crowds and close contact with people

When to contact a doctor?

In some cases, exposure can be very serious. If you are experiencing symptoms of COVID-19, contact your doctor as soon as possible.

If you’re experiencing symptoms of COVID-19 that could be a sign of a severe infection, call your doctor immediately.

When to call 911?

If you’re experiencing symptoms of COVID-19 that could be a sign of a severe infection, call 911 or your local emergency number.

COVID-19 symptoms

  • Fever or chills
  • Cough
  • Shortness of breath or difficulty breathing
  • Fatigue
  • Muscle or body aches
  • Headache
  • New loss of taste or smell
  • Sore throat
  • Congestion or runny nose
  • Sore throat, cough or runny nose
  • Nausea or vomiting
  • Diarrhea
  • Rash
  • Sore throat, runny or stuffy nose, cough, or sneezing
  • Cough that doesn’t go away
  • Bloody or black eyes
  • Muscle aches or stiffness
  • Trouble breathing
  • Loss of taste or smell
  • Sudden confusion
  • Unsteady walk
  • Chest pain or tightness
  • Sudden vision changes
  • Trouble speaking
  • Sudden numbness or loss of sensation in your face, arm or leg
  • Sudden severe headache

What is the difference between COVID-19 and the flu?

Flu and COVID-19 are both respiratory infections. They both cause fever, cough, and congestion. They also both can cause a severe headache that can be debilitating.

However, flu is a milder illness that usually lasts for only a few days. COVID-19 is a more severe illness that can last for several weeks and can lead to death.

What are the differences between the flu and COVID-19?

COVID-19 is a new virus, but the flu is not. The flu is caused by a virus that has been around for a long time and is constantly changing. There are different strains of the flu each year, and the CDC has declared the flu is no longer a cause of concern.

The flu is different from COVID-19 in that it usually only causes a mild illness. It usually lasts for a week or less. People with the flu are at a higher risk for complications if they have COVID-19.

Flu symptoms

  • Croup
  • Colds
  • Sneezing
  • Congestion
  • Sinus pain
  • Sore throats
  • Runny nose
  • Earache
  • Stuffy nose
  • Runny or stuffy nose
  • Ear infections
  • Body aches
  • Stuffy or runny nose
  • Sinus infections
  • Headaches
  • Chest pain
  • Back pain
  • Muscle aches
  • Chills
  • Colds that don’t go away
  • Poor appetite
  • Sore muscles
  • Dizziness
  • Fainting
  • Confusion
  • Muscle weakness
  • Fast or slow heart rate
  • Weakness
  • Sore mouth
  • Hoarseness
  • Canker sores
  • Mouth sores
  • Red eyes
  • Seizures
  • Weakness in one arm or leg
  • Muscle pain
  • Colds that last three weeks

What is the difference between the flu and COVID-19?

COVID-19 is a new virus that causes disease in people. The flu is not.

The flu is caused by a virus that has been around for a long time and is constantly changing.

COVID-19 can be different from the flu in that it usually only causes a mild illness. It usually lasts for a week or less. People with the flu are at a higher risk for complications if they have COVID-19.

The bottom line

A low-grade fever can be a symptom of a serious condition like the flu or a bacterial infection.

A low-grade fever that doesn’t seem to be getting worse is often not a cause for concern.

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