Swollen foot after falling off a ladder

Some people with diabetes have a higher risk of developing a swollen foot after a fall, which can be caused by a lack of blood circulation to the foot.

However, it’s important to note that this risk is higher for people with peripheral artery disease (PAD), which is when the arteries to the legs are narrowed or blocked.

PAD is common in people with diabetes, and one study found that half of all people with PAD will develop other vascular complications.

Peripheral neuropathy

Peripheral neuropathy, which is a common complication of diabetes, can cause a person to experience a tingling, burning, and numb feeling in the hands, feet, and feet. This can cause a person to experience a tingling sensation in the feet.

It’s important to tell the doctor about any symptoms that a person with diabetes is experiencing, including numbness or tingling.

Numbness in the feet or legs

Numbness or tingling in the feet and legs can be due to nerve damage. Nerve damage can be caused by diabetes, but it’s also a common side effect of other conditions, including:

  • Peripheral artery disease (PAD)
  • Peripheral neuropathy
  • Peripheral vascular disease (PVD)
  • Neuropathy
  • Peripheral nerve tumors
  • Injuries
  • Infections

Diabetes-related neuropathy causes numbness or tingling in the hands, feet, and legs. The cause of the numbness or tingling in the feet and legs is often related to a lack of blood circulation to the feet and legs.

In addition, nerve damage can cause a person to experience numbness or tingling in the hands and feet, which can make it difficult for them to use their fingers to perform daily activities.

Diabetes-related numbness or tingling in the hands and feet can also cause a person to experience an unsteady gait.

Tingling in the hands and feet

Tingling or numbness in the hands and feet, especially on one side of the body, can be a sign of peripheral neuropathy.

In some cases, tingling in the hands and feet can be an early warning sign of peripheral neuropathy.

If a person has diabetes and tingling in their hands and feet, they should talk to their doctor about the possibility of peripheral neuropathy.

Diabetic neuropathy can cause numbness or tingling in the hands and feet, and it can also cause a person to experience an unsteady gait.

Tingling and numbness in the hands and feet can be caused by peripheral neuropathy. Tingling and numbness can also be a sign of peripheral vascular disease (PVD), which is a more serious condition that causes a person to experience a lack of blood flow to the legs.

Diabetic nerve damage

Nerve damage is a common complication of diabetes.

Damage to the nerves can lead to numbness and tingling in the hands, feet, and legs. A person can also experience a lack of strength in the hands and feet and a loss of sensation.

Tingling and numbness in the hands and feet is often associated with nerve damage caused by diabetes.

Diabetic nerve damage can also cause a person to experience a loss of strength and a loss of sensation in the hands and feet.

Diabetic neuropathy can also cause a person to have a loss of balance.

Diabetic foot ulcer

A diabetic foot ulcer is a sore that forms on the foot, often due to a lack of blood flow.

A person with diabetes will often develop foot ulcers if they have a diabetic neuropathy that’s related to a lack of blood flow to the feet.

However, a diabetic foot ulcer can also be caused by a bacterial infection or a fungal infection.

People with diabetes are more likely to develop foot ulcers, which can cause foot pain. Ulcers can also make it difficult for a person to put on shoes and socks.

Tingling and numbness in the feet

Tingling and numbness in the hands and feet can be a sign of peripheral neuropathy.

Diabetic neuropathy can cause tingling or numbness in the hands and feet, which is often associated with nerve damage.

Diabetic nerve damage causes tingling or numbness in the hands and feet. People with diabetes are also more likely to experience a loss of strength and a loss of sensation in the hands and feet.

Tingling and numbness can also be a sign of diabetic peripheral neuropathy.

Diabetic mononeuropathy

Diabetic mononeuropathy is a rare complication of diabetes.

Diabetic mononeuropathy causes a person to experience numbness in the feet and legs. This is usually caused by a lack of blood flow to the legs.

Diabetic mononeuropathy can cause a person to experience numbness in the feet and legs that can make it difficult for them to put on shoes.

A person with diabetes is also more likely to experience a loss of strength and a loss of sensation in the feet and legs.

Diabetic neuropathy

Diabetic neuropathy is a common complication of diabetes. It’s a condition that can cause a person to experience numbness or tingling in the hands, feet, and legs.

A person with diabetes may also experience a lack of strength and a loss of sensation in their hands and feet.

People with diabetes are also more likely to develop foot ulcers, which can cause foot pain.

Tingling and numb feet

Tingling or numbness in the feet can be a sign of diabetic neuropathy.

Tingling or numbness in the feet is also often associated with nerve damage caused by diabetes.

Diabetic neuropathy can cause a person to have a loss of strength and a loss of sensation in the feet.

Tingling and numb feet can also be a sign of diabetic mononeuropathy.

Diabetic macular edema

Diabetic macular edema is a condition that can cause a person to experience a loss of vision.

Like diabetic neuropathy, diabetic macular edema can cause a person to experience tingling or numbness in their hands and feet.

Tingling and numb hands

Tingling or numbness can be a sign of diabetic neuropathy.

Tingling in the hands is often associated with nerve damage caused by diabetes.

People with diabetes are also more likely to experience a loss of strength and a loss of sensation in the hands.

Tingling and numb hands can also be a sign of diabetic mononeuropathy.

Diabetic retinopathy

Diabetic retinopathy is a condition that can cause a person to experience a loss of vision.

A person with diabetic retinopathy will usually experience a loss of vision due to diabetic macular edema.

In summary

The symptoms of nerve damage can vary depending on which nerves are affected.

Numbness and tingling are often associated with diabetic neuropathy.

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