Antigen vs immunogen

Antigens are substances that trigger an immune response in your body. These substances are usually found in your body’s tissues and cells.

The immune system identifies and destroys antigens that could cause an infection.

Immunogens are substances that cause an immune response in your body. These substances cannot be detected by the immune system. Instead, your immune system identifies them as “non-self.”

Immunogens are often made from a substance that is present in your body. This is known as an intracellular antigen. They are usually made to train your immune system to respond to a specific target.

What is the difference between an antibody that reacts with an intracellular antigen and an immunogen that causes an immune response?

In normal circumstances, antibodies bind to antigens and remove them from your bloodstream via your kidneys.

If you are exposed to a substance that your body recognizes as “non-self,” your immune system will identify and destroy it.

This is known as an antibody-mediated immune response.

An immunogen-induced immune response is sometimes called an antibody-independent immune response.

Immunogens can also be called antigens, or antigenic substances.

Antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity

Antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity is the process of killing cells that have been damaged by an intracellular antigen.

Antibodies that are present in your blood (antibody-secreting cells) recognize the intracellular antigen on the surface of the cells.

When an antibody binds to the cell, it causes an attack on the cell. This attack leads to the death of the cell.

Antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) is an important part of the immune response. It is one of the first lines of defense against intracellular pathogens.

Antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC) is the process of killing cells that have been damaged by intracellular antigens.

The name of the process comes from the fact that the antibody that is present acts as a killer, or cytolytic.

What is the difference between a cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) and an antibody that reacts with an intracellular antigen?

A cytotoxic T lymphocyte is a type of immune cell that is responsible for the destruction of pathogenic microorganisms, including viruses and bacteria.

A cytotoxic T-lymphocyte (CTL) is an antibody that is produced by a T-cell.

Antibodies that are produced by other types of cells are known as B cells.

A cytotoxic T-lymphocyte will recognize the surface antigens of infected cells.

A T-cell will recognize the surface antigen, or epitope, of an intracellular pathogen.

Intracellular antigens are usually made from substances that are present in your body. This is known as an intracellular antigen.

What is the difference between the immune response against a virus and the immune response against an intracellular antigen?

Viruses have a lipid envelope that consists of a protein membrane and a lipid membrane.

When a virus enters a host cell, it uses the protein membrane to bind to its target. It then uses the lipid membrane to enter the host cell.

An intracellular antigen is a substance that is present in your body.

The cell in which the antigen is present will normally be destroyed by the immune response. However, an intracellular antigen cannot be destroyed by the immune system.

This means that the intracellular antigen will be destroyed by the immune response only when a specific antibody (antibody-secreting cell) recognizes the antigen.

How can I recognize an intracellular?

If you have an intracellular antigen, you will be exposed to it during the course of your normal life.

Identifying an intracellular antigen is important if you are exposed to a virus, bacteria, or other intracellular pathogen.

You will usually experience an antibody-mediated immune response against an intracellular antigen.

An antibody-mediated immune response is the first line of defense against intracellular pathogens.

An intracellular antigen is a substance that is present in your body. It is usually made to train your immune system to respond to a specific target.

What are some examples of intracellular antigens?

Viruses

Viruses are intracellular pathogens. They are surrounded by a lipid envelope that consists of a protein membrane and a lipid membrane.

Viruses infect cells via the protein membrane.

Once inside the cell, they use the lipid membrane to enter the host cell.

The following are some examples of viruses that can cause an intracellular infection.

Herpes viruses

Human herpes virus (HHV) 1, 2, and 6 cause a wide range of diseases, including cold sores, genital herpes, and shingles.

HHV 1 causes a primary infection in the lymph nodes and brain. HHV 2 and HHV 6 cause a primary infection in the salivary glands and genital skin.

HHV 4 is a herpes virus that causes a latent infection in the nervous system.

HHV 6 is the cause of roseola, a common viral infection in children.

Rabies virus

Rabies is a viral infection that can cause severe symptoms in humans and other mammals.

It is caused by the rabies virus. Rabies is usually transmitted to humans by infected animals, such as bats, raccoons, and skunks. It can also be transmitted from infected animals to humans.

The rabies virus is an intracellular virus.

The rabies virus has a complex life cycle. It enters a host cell and uses the protein membrane to enter the cell. It then uses the lipid membrane to enter the host cell.

Some examples of intracellular proteins are listed below.

Epstein-Barr virus

Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is a human virus that can cause infectious mononucleosis.

EBV is an intracellular pathogen.

EBV is an enveloped virus that has a lipid membrane.

EBV has two envelope glycoproteins. The glycoprotein gp350 has an antigenic site that can be recognized by antibodies.

EBV uses this antigenic site to enter the cell.

EBV is found in mononuclear cells (lymphocytes).

How does the immune response against an intracellular virus differ from the immune response against a bacterial or fungal pathogen?

The immune response against a bacterial or fungal pathogen is mainly antibody-mediated.

Your body will make antibodies to the bacterial or fungal pathogen and these antibodies will bind to and destroy the pathogen.

The immune response against a viral infection is mainly antibody-independent.

There is no single antibody that can recognize the intracellular virus and destroy it.

What is the outlook?

The outlook for an intracellular pathogen depends on the type of infection you have.

For example, the outlook for a common cold depends on whether the virus that caused the infection is a rhinovirus, a coronavirus, or a respiratory syncytial virus (RSV).

Common colds are caused by rhinoviruses. The outlook for rhinovirus infections has been reported to be good.

The outlook for a coronavirus infection depends on which virus causes the infection.

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