Benefits of Folic acid

Folate is an essential B vitamin that the body cannot make itself. It is made in the body from the amino acid, riboflavin. In addition to folic acid, the body also requires magnesium and vitamin B6 to be able to make vitamin B12.

The Recommended Daily Intake (RDI) for folic acid is 400 micrograms (mcg) for adults up to and including 70 kg and 1200 mcg for adults over 70 kg.

A recent study by the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) found that more than half of all pregnant women were not getting enough folate during their first trimester.

In this study, the authors concluded that “the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) recommends folate and folic acid supplements for all women of childbearing age starting in the first trimester of pregnancy.”

Folate, folic acid, and pregnancy

While pregnancy can be a good time to increase folate intake, it is also important to maintain this intake throughout a woman’s life. In fact, a study published in the journal Pediatrics showed that taking too much folate during pregnancy increases the risk of developing neural tube defects (NTDs) in the fetus.

NTDs are birth defects that occur in the brain, spinal cord, and spinal nerves. They can lead to a variety of conditions, including spina bifida, an incomplete spinal cord, and congenital heart defects.

According to the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, women who took 800 mcg of folic acid daily during pregnancy had a lower risk of having babies with NTDs.

The study also found that women who took folic acid daily during pregnancy had a reduced risk of having a large baby.

Other studies have found that high folic acid intake can reduce the risk of NTDs.

In all, the AAP recommends a daily intake of 400 mcg of folic acid for all women of childbearing age.

Folic acid and pregnancy complications

Folic acid can protect the brain and spinal cord of the fetus from the effects of congenital disorders.

However, there are some risks associated with high folic acid intake during pregnancy.

According to the Mayo Clinic, taking too much folic acid during pregnancy may increase your risk of having a baby with a cleft palate.

A cleft palate occurs when a baby’s soft palate (the tissue that separates the mouth from the nasal passage) separates from the roof of the mouth.

Increased risk

A study in the journal Pediatrics found that among pregnant women who took 400 mcg of folic acid daily, the risk of having a baby with a cleft palate was increased by 14 percent.

The study authors concluded that “folic acid supplementation is recommended for women who are planning to become pregnant and who are planning to become pregnant within the next 2 years.”

In a study published in the Archives of Disease in Childhood, researchers found that taking 400 mcg of folic acid daily during pregnancy does not increase the risk of complications from an NTD.

Lower risk

A study published in the journal Pediatrics found that taking 400 mcg of folic acid daily during pregnancy does not increase your risk of having a large baby.

Low folate

A low folate diet may increase the risk of developing anemia. However, this risk is low.

According to the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, folate deficiency is rare in developed countries.

According to the National Institutes of Health (NIH), the main source of folate in the body is from the diet.

A recent study published in the journal Advances in Nutrition found that an excessive intake of foods high in folate can result in low blood levels of folate.

While it is true that eating more folic acid can help to increase blood levels of folic acid, it is also important to eat foods rich in folate.

An abnormal folate status is a concern because it may increase the risk of developing NTDs.

A study published in the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA) examined the relationship between folic acid intake and NTDs in the United States.

Researchers found that folic acid intake during the first trimester of pregnancy was associated with a decreased risk of NTDs.

An observational study published in the journal Annals of Nutrition and Metabolism found that women who took 400 mcg of folic acid daily during pregnancy had a lower risk of having a large baby.

However, other studies have found that taking folic acid can increase the risk of NTDs.

A study published in the journal Pediatrics found that taking 400 mcg of folic acid daily during pregnancy increased the risk of having a baby with a cleft palate.

Other studies have found that taking folic acid increases the risk of NTDs.

Women who take folic acid may want to take a multivitamin that includes folic acid.

What is folate?

Folate is a B vitamin that is available in two forms:

  • Folic acid
  • Folinic acid

Folinic acid is a synthetic form of folic acid that is not absorbed in the body. It is used for research, such as in the treatment of anemia.

Folic acid is important for the production of red blood cells and DNA synthesis.

Children and adolescents need folic acid because they are growing and maturing at a faster rate.

Folate is also found in many foods, such as:

  • Leafy green vegetables
  • Beans and peas
  • Citrus fruits
  • Broccoli
  • Asparagus
  • Spinach
  • Lentils

Folate deficiencies can cause anemia. In fact, the NIH note that the primary source of folate in the body is from the diet.

The amount of folate in your diet will depend on the amount of folic acid you eat.

What is folic acid?

Folic acid is a synthetic form of folate, which is important for the production of red blood cells and DNA synthesis.

Folic acid is also found in many foods, such as:

  • Leafy green veggies
  • Citrus fruit

Folic acid deficiency can cause anemia. In fact, the NIH note that the primary source of folate in the body is diet.

A folic acid deficiency may affect your nervous system. It may also lead to decreased production of red blood cells and anemia.

How much is too much?

Experts recommend that women who are pregnant or planning to become pregnant take a multivitamin that includes 400 mcg of folic acid daily.

It is important to note that folic acid supplements can increase the risk of side effects.

These side effects may include:

  • Nausea
  • Vomiting
  • Heartburn
  • Diarrhea
  • Headache
  • Dizziness
  • Fatigue
  • Tiredness

If you are taking folic acid, be sure to drink plenty of water.

If you have high blood pressure or heart disease, you should not take folic acid supplements.

Talk to your doctor before using folic acid supplements if you have any of the following conditions:

  • Bleeding disorders
  • Kidney disease
  • Heart disease
  • Liver disease

What is the best time to take folic acid?

The NIH note that the best time to take folic acid is between first and 12 weeks of pregnancy. After the 12 week mark, taking folic acid is no longer recommended.

Take folic acid during pregnancy

The NIH note that folic acid is safe during pregnancy. However, the NIH recommend that you should not take folic acid if you have:

  • High blood pressure
  • Congestive heart failure
  • Diabetes
  • Cancer
  • Pregnant or nursing
  • A history of NTDs

Talk to your doctor before taking folic acid if you are pregnant or planning to become pregnant.

Take folic acid if you are deficient in folic acid

Folic acid is important for the production of red blood cells and DNA and folate is a B vitamin that is important for the production of red blood cells and DNA.

If you are deficient in folate, your doctor will recommend that you take a multivitamin that includes folic acid.

Talk to your doctor before taking folic acid if you are deficient in folate.

Take a multivitamin that includes folic acid

Folic acid, or folic acid, is a synthetic form of folate, which is important for the production of red blood cells and DNA.

Multivitamin supplements containing folic acid may be safe to take during pregnancy. They may also be safe to take if you are deficient in folic acid.

Summary

Folic acid supplements can cause side effects, such as nausea, vomiting, and diarrhea. It is important to check with your doctor before taking folic acid.

If you are pregnant or planning to become pregnant, talk to your healthcare provider before taking folic acid supplements.

Images by Freepik

Generated by AI

0 0 votes
Article Rating
Subscribe
Notify of
guest
0 Comments
Inline Feedbacks
View all comments
0
Would love your thoughts, please comment.x
()
x