Does chocolate cause diabetes?

The connection between chocolate and diabetes is a little unclear. The relationship isn’t as consistent as we’d like it to be.

It’s also hard to tease out the details since researchers have had limited time to conduct studies.

The relationship isn’t that straightforward

It’s pretty clear that chocolate and type 2 diabetes are closely related. So much so that a 2009 study found that the consumption of dark chocolate was associated with lower risk of developing the disease.

The study, which is one of the older ones, looked at over 2,500 participants over a period of 10 years. The researchers found that the incidence of type 2 diabetes was reduced by 20 percent.

The study also found that the consumption of dark chocolate was associated with lower risk of developing type 2 diabetes.

The researchers concluded that the “chocolate-type polyphenols, not the chocolate itself, are more likely to reduce the risk of type 2 diabetes.”

According to the study, dark chocolate is rich in bioactive polyphenols. These are compounds that give chocolate its flavor.

These polyphenols are thought to reduce blood sugar levels. They’re also thought to have other health benefits.

Some studies have also suggested that cocoa may have a protective effect against type 2 diabetes.

A meta-analysis of 11 studies found that cocoa was associated with lower risk of diabetes. The researchers concluded that “cocoa was associated with a lower risk of high blood sugar.”

However, this study only looked at epidemiological studies and didn’t look at clinical trials. It’s also worth noting that the study only considered consumption of cocoa.

A 2017 clinical trial looked at the effect of cocoa on people with type 2 diabetes. The participants were randomly selected.

The researchers found that daily consumption of cocoa reduced blood sugar levels by an average of 2.3 mmol/L.

The researchers concluded that “cocoa can be considered as an effective treatment of type 2 diabetes.”

The studies above are the only ones that have looked at the effect of cocoa on type 2 diabetes. It’s important to note that they didn’t look at the effect of dark chocolate.

It’s also important to note that there’s no single type of chocolate that’s linked with type 2 diabetes.

It all depends on the amount of cocoa

The amount of cocoa in your chocolate also plays a role in the effect it has on your blood sugar levels.

In a 2017 study, researchers found that “the effect of flavonoid-rich cocoa on glycemic response was dependent on the content of flavonoids.”

The researchers also found that “the effect of the flavonoid-rich cocoa was significantly greater than the effect of the flavonoid-poor cocoa.”

A 2010 study also found that “the effect of dark chocolate on glycemic response was dependent on the phenolic compounds.”

The same study also concluded that “cocoa flavanols were the main phenolic compounds responsible for the decrease in the glycemic response.”

The researchers concluded that “cocoa flavanols may be a useful therapeutic agent for diabetes and obesity.”

The study also found that “flavanols were significantly associated with glycemic response after dark chocolate consumption.”

A 2014 study found that “chocolate flavanols were significantly associated with glycemic response after whole-food exercise.”

The study concluded that “chocolate flavanols may be effective for the management of type 2 diabetes.”

The effect of dark chocolate

A 2010 study looked at the effect of dark chocolate on people with type 2 diabetes. The study included people with a body mass index (BMI) between 25 and 35 kg/m.

The researchers found that after 15 weeks, the participants’ fasting blood sugar levels had decreased by 11.6 percent.

When the researchers looked at the participants’ overall cholesterol levels, the researchers found that their total cholesterol levels had decreased by 7.4 percent.

It’s thought that the reduction in blood sugar levels and cholesterol levels is due to the cocoa flavanols.

However, the study was small and didn’t look at the effect of dark chocolate specifically.

According to the study, “The beneficial effect of cocoa flavanols on the glycemic response was greater than that of cocoa powder or white chocolate.”

A 2017 study compared the effect of dark chocolate and regular chocolate on blood sugar levels in people with type 2 diabetes.

The researchers found that dark chocolate had a relatively greater effect on blood sugar levels than regular chocolate.

However, the researchers also concluded that “the effect of dark chocolate was not better than that of low calorie/low carbohydrate chocolate.”

The researchers concluded: “The effect of dark chocolate on glycemic response was not improved by the addition of sugar.”

The best dark chocolate

The quality of dark chocolate is important for your health.

The type of cocoa powder, the cocoa butter, and the amount of sugar in the chocolate all affect how it affects your blood sugar levels.

The best dark chocolate for people with type 2 diabetes is:

  • Dark chocolate with at least 85 percent cocoa
  • Dark chocolate with at least 70 percent cocoa butter

It’s also important to note that the best dark chocolate doesn’t have a specific type of chocolate.

It’s important to choose dark chocolate that’s made with quality ingredients, such as:

  • Cocoa
  • Cocoa butter
  • Sugar
  • Milk
  • Vanilla

You can also find dark chocolate brands that are suitable for people with type 2 diabetes.

Here are some of the brands:

  • Lindt
  • Ghirardelli
  • Scharffen Berger
  • Lindt Linden

What about milk chocolate?

Milk chocolate is a type of chocolate that’s made from milk. Milk chocolate is sweet, but it doesn’t contain as much cocoa butter as dark chocolate.

In general, milk chocolate has more sugar than dark chocolate. However, there are some types of milk chocolate that contain a higher percentage of cocoa.

Some of the brands that make milk chocolate include:

  • Ghirardeli
  • Barry Callebaut
  • Lindor
  • Lindemann
  • Mars

Are there any health benefits of dark chocolate?

As mentioned above, there are some health benefits to eating dark chocolate.

A 2014 study found that “cocoa flavanols improved glycemic control and increased insulin sensitivity in healthy subjects.”

The same study also found that “cocoa flavanols had a positive effect on blood lipids.”

The researchers also concluded that “cocoa flavanols are more effective than cocoa powder in improving blood lipids.”

However, the researchers also found that “cocoa flavanols were neither as effective as cocoa powder in improving blood lipids nor as effective as a combination of a high fiber diet and exercise in reducing blood lipids.”

A 2016 study also found that “cocoa flavanols were able to decrease blood glucose in type 2 diabetic mice.”

However, the researchers also concluded that “cocoa flavanols had no effect on blood glucose.”

According to the study, “the effect of cocoa flavanols on blood glucose was not correlated with their effects on glycemic response.”

The study also concluded that “cocoa flavanols were able to improve the gut microbiota in type 2 diabetic patients.”

What’s the best way to eat dark chocolate?

The best way to eat dark chocolate is to choose dark chocolate that contains at least 85 percent cocoa.

It’s also important to choose dark chocolate that contains at least 70 percent cocoa butter.

Both of these ingredients are the same as the ones in milk chocolate.

What’s the best way to consume dark chocolate?

It’s best to eat dark chocolate with a spoon. Don’t mix the chocolate with any other food.

The best way to eat dark chocolate is to eat it like a dessert.

The following are some of the best ways to eat dark chocolate:

  • Add dark chocolate to your favorite dessert.
  • Enjoy it as a topping on your favorite foods.
  • Add it to your morning smoothie.
  • Add it to your evening hot cocoa.
  • Enjoy it as a snack.
  • Add it to a bowl of ice cream.
  • Enjoy it as a garnish on your favorite foods.

Dark chocolate and heart health

Dark chocolate is linked to a lower risk of heart disease.

The takeaway

There’s some evidence that dark chocolate can lower your blood sugar levels and cholesterol levels.

However, there’s no evidence that milk chocolate can lower your blood sugar levels.

Images by Freepik

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