Throat pain when crying psychology

The throat is located at the lower part of the throat that is responsible for the vocal cords, also called larynx. The larynx is an organ of the throat and opens to the outside world through the mouth. It plays an important role in our breathing and speaking.

The pain in the throat when crying is known as laryngolaryngeal pain. This pain occurs when the nerves that control the muscles of the larynx are injured.

The pain is usually in the front of the throat, near the larynx. Sometimes the pain can also be felt in the back of the throat.

Some people experience throat pain when they cry because the muscles of the throat do not perform the same actions they previously did.

Injury to the larynx can also be caused by a traumatic blow to the throat, such as a car crash.

Causes of throat pain when crying

A blow to the throat can cause the following types of injuries to the throat:

  • Damage to the nerves that control the muscles of the larynx

Damage to the nerves of the larynx can be caused by a blow to the throat or by a blow from another person.

There are three major nerves that control the muscles of the larynx. The nerves that control the movement of the vocal cords are located in the front of the larynx.

When these nerves are injured, the muscles that move the vocal cords are not controlled by the nerves. The muscles of the larynx are responsible for producing and controlling the sound of the voice.

Blow to the throat

A blow to the throat can cause the following injuries:

  • Traumatic injury
  • Larynx fracture
  • Laryngeal nerve injury
  • Laryngitis

Larynx fracture

The larynx is a very delicate organ. When it is injured, it tends to heal very slowly. This is why many people do not know that they have injured their larynx until it is too late.

Nerve injury

The nerves of the larynx are located in the front part of the larynx. When the nerves of the larynx are damaged, the muscles that control the vocal cords are not controlled.

Usually, the vocal cords do not move but the larynx does not produce sound.

Laryngitis

Laryngitis is inflammation of the vocal cords, which are located in the front part of the larynx.

When the larynx has laryngitis, it tends to produce hoarseness, a cough, and an abnormal voice.

Laryngeal nerve injury

The nerves of the larynx are located in the front part of the larynx. When a blow to the throat damages these nerves, the vocal cords do not move and the larynx does not produce sound.

Laryngeal nerve injury can be caused by:

  • A blow to the throat
  • A blow from another person
  • A fall
  • A car crash

Trauma to the larynx

Trauma to the larynx can cause the following types of injuries:

  • Laryngeal paralysis
  • Laryngeal hematoma
  • Laryngeal laceration

Laryngeal paralysis

Laryngeal paralysis is a condition in which the vocal cords do not move. The muscles of the larynx are paralyzed. This is a serious condition that may cause the airways to become blocked and breathing to become difficult.

It may be caused by a blow to the throat or by a blow from another person.

Laryngeal hematoma

Laryngeal hematoma is a condition in which blood collects in the larynx. This is a serious condition that may cause breathing to become difficult.

It can be caused by a blow to the throat or by a blow from another person.

Laryngeal laceration

Laryngeal laceration is a condition in which a piece of the larynx is cut. This can be caused by a blow to the throat or from another person.

An injury to the larynx can cause the following symptoms:

  • Voice changes
  • Hoarseness
  • A cough
  • Difficulty breathing

When to see a doctor?

If you have throat pain when crying that you cannot control or that gets worse, it is time to see a doctor.

If you are having trouble breathing because of throat pain when crying, you should also see a doctor.

If you have any of the following symptoms, it is important to seek medical attention:

  • A fever
  • A headache
  • A sore throat
  • Trouble swallowing

Diagnosis

The doctor will first ask about your medical history. This will include symptoms you have had when crying and when you are not crying.

They will also ask what kind of pain the pain in the throat is and if pain is located in the front of the throat, near the larynx, or in the back of the throat.

The doctor may also ask about other symptoms you have. For example, they may ask if you have any of the following:

  • Difficulty swallowing
  • Coughing or breathing difficulties
  • A blocked or runny nose
  • Hoarsness
  • A hoarse voice

The doctor will examine your throat. They will listen to your voice and may ask for you to produce your voice. Your doctor will also ask you to breathe in and out while they listen to your voice.

They will also ask you to breathe in and out at different volumes.

If they think that you are having a nerve injury, they will ask you to breathe in and out while they have your larynx put in a position that will show if the nerve is injured.

They may also ask you to breathe in and out while they use a stroboscope, which is a very small instrument that is placed up your nose. This is done to see if the vocal cords are moving.

If they think that you have a laryngeal hematoma, they will ask you to breathe in and out while they use an ultrasound to see if the blood is accumulating in the larynx.

In some cases, they will ask if you have any pain when you breathe.

If they think that you have a laryngeal injury, they may take a sample of your blood with a needle. This is called a laryngoscopy.

The doctor may also order an MRI, CT scan, or a laryngoscopy.

A laryngoscopy is an imaging test that doctors use to look at the vocal cords.

How is a laryngoscopy done?

The procedure involves a doctor placing a lighted instrument called a laryngoscope into the nostril.

The doctor will then look at the vocal cords and other structures in the larynx.

What do the results mean?

If the MRI or CT scan shows that there is a nerve injury, the doctor will do a laryngoscopy.

If the laryngoscopy shows that there is a laryngeal hematoma, the doctor will do a lumbar puncture. This is a procedure in which they insert a needle into the lower back.

The sample of blood they take will be tested to see if there is any bleeding from the larynx. If there is bleeding, the doctor will then treat the larynx with medication.

If they find that there is no bleeding or that the injury is not causing any symptoms, the doctor will then send a sample of the blood to a laboratory for testing.

How can the results be used?

The results of the laryngeal laceration test will help the doctor to figure out the best treatment for you. They will be able to tell if you need surgery or if your injury is minor and can be treated with medication.

The results of the nerve injury test will help the doctor figure out what kind of treatment you need.

If the MRI or CT scan shows that there is no nerve injury, the doctor will do a laryngoscopy.

If the laryngoscopy shows no injury, the doctor will then treat the larynx with medication.

If the laryngoscopy shows injury, the doctor will then treat the injury with surgery.

What are the risks?

If you have any of the following symptoms, you may have a nerve injury:

  • Swallowing problems
  • Hoarsal or breathy voice
  • Pain in the throat when crying

Some people can develop a hoarse voice. If you have this symptom, you may have a nerve injury in the vocal cords.

If you have a hoarse voice, you may have trouble talking or breathing.

If you are taking medication, you should not take it if you have any of these symptoms.

If you are pregnant, you should not have this test.

If the test shows that you have a nerve injury, the doctor will treat it with medication.

If the test shows that you do not have a nerve injury, you may need surgery.

Outlook

The outlook for people with a laryngeal nerve injury depends on the cause. Laryngeal injuries can be serious.

In the most serious cases, the vocal cords are paralyzed, and the airways can become blocked. Complications can include:

  • A loss of feeling or an inability to feel
  • Infection
  • A stroke

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