Taking insulin without food

If you’re experiencing hypoglycemia, eating a high-carbohydrate snack will help raise your blood sugar level.

If you need to take extra insulin, you can take it with a small amount of liquid food like fruit juice, popsicle, or milk.

If you don’t want to eat, you can take a small amount of fast-acting insulin, which is the same size as the liquid food.

Use this method only as a last resort. You should always first try to eat food or take carbohydrate to raise your blood sugar before using this method.

What if you have a high blood sugar level?

If you have a high level of blood sugar, you may need to take extra insulin to keep it under control.

Here are some things you can do to help lower your blood sugar level:

  • Take a small amount of fast-acting insulin before eating.
  • Take a small amount of fast-acting insulin after eating.
  • Eat a snack with a very high carbohydrate content, such as rice, crackers, or fruit.
  • Eat a snack with a very low carbohydrate content, such as applesauce, bananas, or honey.
  • Eat two small snacks at night, one with a very high carbohydrate content and one with a very low carbohydrate content.

What if you have low blood sugar?

If your blood sugar is low, you may need to take extra insulin to raise it.

Here are some things you can do to help raise your blood sugar level:

What does the term “diabetes” mean?

The term “diabetes” is used to refer to a group of diseases that affect the way your body uses insulin.

Diabetes is not a single disease. Instead, it’s a term used to describe a group of metabolic diseases.

These diseases include prediabetes, gestational diabetes, type 1 diabetes, type 2 diabetes, and some forms of impaired glucose tolerance.

What is prediabetes?

Prediabetes is a condition in which your blood sugar level is higher than normal but not high enough to be diagnosed as diabetes.

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), around 2.8 million adults in the United States have prediabetes.

Prediabetes can be either type 1 or type 2 diabetes.

In type 1 diabetes, your pancreas doesn’t make enough insulin. This causes your blood sugar level to rise. In type 2 diabetes, your pancreas doesn’t make enough insulin or your body is resistant to insulin.

Both types of prediabetes can progress to type 2 diabetes over time.

What causes prediabetes?

Prediabetes is most commonly caused by lifestyle factors.

These include:

  • Being overweight
  • Having a high intake of refined carbohydrates, such as white bread, pastries, and sugar-sweetened foods
  • Having a lack of exercise
  • Having a family history of diabetes

Although you can’t completely prevent prediabetes, you can take steps to improve your risk factors.

What does gestational diabetes mean?

Gestational diabetes is a condition that occurs during pregnancy. It can be caused by anything that increases your risk of gestational diabetes.

According to the CDC, gestational diabetes occurs in 8 to 10 percent of pregnant women.

Gestational diabetes is diagnosed based on two criteria:

  • Your blood sugar level is higher than normal.
  • You aren’t pregnant and aren’t using birth control.

Women who already have diabetes or prediabetes are at a higher risk for gestational diabetes.

If you have gestational diabetes, you may be diagnosed with prediabetes or diabetes after the baby is born.

What is type 1 diabetes?

Type 1 diabetes occurs when the immune system destroys the insulin-producing cells of the pancreas.

Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune disease.

According to the CDC, type 1 diabetes affects about 1.6 million people in the United States.

Type 1 diabetes is typically diagnosed between the ages of 30 and 60, although it can occur at any age.

According to the American Diabetes Association, type 1 diabetes is more common in men than in women.

How is type 2 diabetes diagnosed?

Type 2 diabetes is a common chronic condition that requires constant attention and management.

If you have type 2 diabetes, your doctor will talk to you about your medical history, lifestyle habits, and diet.

They may also take your blood pressure and check your blood sugar level.

If they suspect you have type 2 diabetes, they’ll likely refer you to a doctor who is trained in diabetes.

Your doctor will want to know if you have any of the following risk factors:

  • Overweight or obesity
  • A family history of diabetes
  • A sedentary lifestyle
  • A high intake of refined carbohydrates, such as white bread, pastries, and sugar-sweetened foods
  • A lack of exercise
  • Having high blood pressure

Your doctor may also need to perform several tests to confirm your diagnosis.

These tests include:

  • A fasting blood sugar test. This test measures your blood sugar level before any foods or drinks. Your doctor may want you to fast for eight hours before the test, which can help rule out certain conditions.
  • A one-hour postprandial blood sugar test. This test measures your blood sugar levels after you’ve eaten.
  • A two-hour postprandial blood sugar test. This test measures your blood sugar levels at two hours after you’ve eaten.
  • A two-hour area under the blood glucose curve test. This test measures your blood glucose level over a two-hour period.
  • A hemoglobin A1c test. The A1c test measures the amount of sugar in your blood. It can show how well your body is using insulin.

How is type 2 diabetes treated?

Your doctor will likely recommend lifestyle changes to control your blood sugar level.

They may also recommend some over-the-counter medications to help treat your type 2 diabetes.

Some of these medications include:

  • Metformin
  • Glimepiride
  • Repaglinide
  • Glipizide
  • Acarbose
  • Miglitol
  • Nateglinide

You may also need to take insulin.

Your doctor may also recommend that you take a diet, as well.

Dietary changes can help your blood sugar levels by reducing your intake of fat and sugar.

You may also need to monitor your blood sugar levels more often.

Here are some tips to help you meet your blood sugar targets:

  • Take your insulin as prescribed.
  • Don’t skip meals.
  • Drink plenty of water.
  • Exercise regularly.
  • Take your medications as directed.

What is gestational diabetes?

Gestational diabetes occurs in pregnant women. It usually occurs within the first four months of pregnancy.

Gestational diabetes is typically diagnosed based on two criteria:

  • You’re pregnant and haven’t had a baby yet.

You aren’t pregnant and aren’t using birth control or you haven’t had a miscarriage.

Finally

You’re pregnant and your blood sugar is higher than usual. It’s called gestational diabetes. Here’s what to do. (Video)

Gestational diabetes can lead to:

  • High blood pressure
  • Kidney and vision problems
  • A high birth weight
  • High blood sugar in the newborn

If you have gestational diabetes, your doctor will likely refer you to a doctor who specializes in women’s health.

Treatment for gestational diabetes will depend on your symptoms:

  • Diet and exercise. Your doctor will likely recommend that you decrease your intake of refined carbohydrates, such as white bread, pastries, and sugar-sweetened foods.
  • Medications. Your doctor will likely suggest that you take a combination of insulin and a glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) agonist.

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