Abdomen pain while walking

This is not uncommon more than half of people with MS experience frequent abdominal pain. According to the National Multiple Sclerosis Society, about one-third of people with MS develop bowel dysfunction.

Some people with MS have pain in the mid’ to lower’ abdomen, while others have pain that develops in the lower abdomen.

Abdominal pain in an MS flare vs. non-flare point of view

Abdominal pain may be an MS flare-up or not. In fact, there has been some debate over the term “flare-up” versus “flare.”

In the past, the term “flare” was often used to describe the condition of experiencing multiple flares of MS symptoms.

However, the term “flare-up” is now being used more and more in the medical community, and is a more accurate way to describe the symptoms of MS.

The National Multiple Sclerosis Society maintains that flare-ups may be a more accurate description of the condition.

The term “flare” is used more and more when describing MS symptoms, and is not the same as “flare-up.”

Symptoms of abdominal pain and MS flare-up

Abdominal pain is a common symptom of MS.

Abdominal pain is a hallmark symptom of MS, and can either be constant or vary depending on the areas of the body affected and the severity of the pain.

The pain is often described as aching, dull, or burning.

The location of pain can range from the lower abdomen to the upper abdomen.

Some people also experience back pain and other symptoms, such as:

  • Fatigue
  • Bladder, bowel, and sexual problems
  • Eye problems
  • Neck pain
  • Nausea
  • Sensitivity to light
  • Tingling

Differences between MS flare-ups and non-flare-ups

Abdominal pain is often a common symptom of MS.

Abdominal pain can be a symptom of MS, or it can occur as a symptom of a non-MS flare-up.

Abdominal pain is one of the most common signs of MS in the first few years after diagnosis.

This pain can be a symptom of other conditions, and can be caused by other conditions.

There are some symptoms that are more likely to be a symptom of MS than others. These symptoms include:

  • Bladder and bowel problems
  • Fatique
  • Sexual dysfunction
  • Numbness in fingers and toes
  • Numbness in the face
  • Pain from MS lesions
  • Weakness in the legs and feet
  • Trouble walking
  • Headaches and migraines
  • Vision problems
  • Numbness in the hands and arms

Risk factors for abdominal pain

Some of the same risk factors that are associated with MS can increase the risk of abdominal pain.

These risk factors include:

  • Gender: Women are more likely to experience abdominal pain.
  • Age: As people age, their chances for abdominal pain increases.
  • Genetics: People with a family history of MS are at higher risk of experiencing abdominal pain.
  • Other conditions: People with an existing gastrointestinal condition, heart problems, or chronic pain may be at higher risk of abdominal pain.
  • Medications: Certain medications can increase the likelihood of abdominal pain.

How to manage abdominal pain?

To help manage abdominal pain, there are many treatment options.

Some of these treatment options may include:

  • Medications to reduce pain: Some pain relievers are known as “antispasticity” drugs, or “antispasticity medication.” These medications are designed to reduce spasticity and other symptoms of MS.
  • Non-drug methods: Some people find that physical therapy, massage, and acupuncture can help treat abdominal pain.
  • Relaxation techniques: People can find success with relaxation techniques when they try to manage abdominal pain.

Can abdominal pain be managed?

A doctor or other healthcare professional can recommend a treatment plan for abdominal pain that works for you.

Treating abdominal pain with an anti-spasticity medication can be effective if the pain is caused by spasticity.

Medications are available to help with aching, dull, and burning abdominal pain.

Non-drug options can be helpful when a doctor recommends physical therapy or other treatments for abdominal pain.

What is the takeaway?

Abdominal pain can be a symptom of MS, as well as a symptom of a non-MS flare.

If you experience abdominal pain, talk to your doctor about your symptoms.

If you are experiencing abdominal pain, it is important to talk to your doctor to determine the cause of your symptoms.

In some cases, abdominal pain can be a symptom of another condition and not MS.

It is also important to talk to your doctor or other healthcare professional if you experience abdominal pain as a result of a medication.

If abdominal pain has been a symptom of an MS flare-up and you are experiencing an MS flare-up, you may want to talk to your doctor.

Your doctor may be able to provide treatment options to help you manage the symptoms of MS flare-ups.

If you experience abdominal pain that is not a symptom of MS and is not a symptom of a non-MS flare-up, it may be a symptom of another condition.

It is important to discuss your symptoms with your doctor so they can provide a proper diagnosis.

If you do not have a diagnosis, it is important to talk to your doctors about ways to manage your symptoms.

Your doctor will be able to recommend lifestyle modifications, non-drug options, and other treatment options that may help you manage symptoms and live a full life.

If you are experiencing abdominal pain that is not a symptom of MS, talk to your doctor. They can provide the proper diagnosis and treatment options.

If you are experiencing abdominal pain and you are not experiencing a symptom of MS, talk to your doctor.

They can provide the proper diagnosis and treatment for your symptoms.

The health of your bowels can be a symptom of MS.

The takeaway

Abdominal pain can be a symptom of MS.

If you are having abdominal pain, talk to your doctor. They can help determine if it is a symptom of MS.

If it is, they can help determine the cause of the abdominal pain and recommend the proper treatment options for you.

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