Anal yeast infection

Anal yeast infection (tinea) is a bacterial infection, often caused by a fungus.

Yeast is a type of fungus. It grows in wet, dark places, such as the anus.

Tinea is a noncontagious fungal infection. It’s different from a fungal infection of the skin elsewhere on the body because it’s not spread through contact with the skin.

Yeast infections can be caused by a number of different types of fungus. They can be spread by sexual contact or by the transfer of skin particles from someone who has a yeast infection.

Yeast infections can occur at any age. They’re more common in people who are obese or overweight. They’re also more common among men.

Although most yeast infections clear up without treatment, some people don’t. They may develop a recurrence.

If the infection spreads to other parts of the body, it can lead to a systemic (whole body) infection.

What are the symptoms of a yeast infection?

Symptoms of a yeast infection include:

  • Itching or burning in the anal area
  • Pain or discomfort when passing stool
  • Pain when passing gas
  • Redness or swelling of the anal area
  • A white, cottage cheese-like discharge
  • Fever
  • A rash, sometimes with a cottage cheese-like texture
  • Weakness

What causes a yeast infection?

Yeast infections are caused by a fungus called Candida. Candida is known as a commensal organism that lives in the mouth, gut, and vagina. It’s also found in the skin, mucous membranes, and vaginal and urinary tracts.

Candida is a normal part of the human body. It’s present in our digestive tract, skin, and vagina.

When a person who isn’t sick has a yeast infection, it’s usually caused by a Candida fungus that’s already in the body.

If a person has a yeast infection, it may be due to the Candida fungus entering their body through a cut or other break in the skin.

What are the risk factors for a yeast infection?

Certain factors can increase the risk of getting a yeast infection. These include:

  • Being overweight or obese
  • Having a weakened immune system
  • Taking antibiotics or other medications that can suppress the immune system
  • Having a chronic health condition, such as diabetes or cancer
  • Having certain health conditions, such as a weak immune system or a digestive tract disorder
  • Receiving certain injections or other medical treatments, such as corticosteroids or immunosuppressants
  • Being pregnant or breastfeeding

How is a yeast infection diagnosed?

If you have symptoms of a yeast infection, see your doctor. Your doctor can diagnose you with a yeast infection by examining your anus. Your doctor may also take a biopsy sample of the infection.

If you have a systemic (whole body) infection, your doctor may take a body or stool sample. This is called a biopsy.

How is a yeast infection treated?

Treatment for a yeast infection depends on the extent of the infection and how severe it is.

If you have a mild yeast infection, your doctor may recommend that you use an antifungal cream. You should apply the cream frequently.

If you have a moderate or severe yeast infection, your doctor may prescribe an antifungal oral medication. You may need to take the medication for a long time.

You should also:

  • Avoid using douches and other products that contain lotions or oils. These products can make the infection worse.
  • Avoid using products that contain strong fragrances.
  • Don’t share personal items, such as razors or toothbrushes, with others.
  • Avoid using douches or other products that contain lotions or oils.
  • Notify your doctor if you develop a fever or rash.

How can I prevent a yeast infection?

Yeast infections are caused by a fungus. To prevent a yeast infection, avoid sharing personal items, such as razors or toothbrushes, with others.

You should also:

  • Wash your hands frequently.
  • Use the bathroom before having a bowel movement.
  • Don’t douche.
  • Don’t use any products that contain lotions or oils.

Yeast infections can spread to the genital area and to other parts of the body. If you have one, you’ll need to see a doctor for a diagnosis and treatment.

What’s the long-term outlook for a yeast infection?

If you don’t treat a yeast infection, you can develop a systemic (whole body) infection. This infection can be life-threatening.

If left untreated, systemic infections can be fatal.

A systemic infection develops when your immune system responds to the infection and is able to fight it off. If your immune system responds too much, it can cause damage to your organs.

How can I reduce my chances of getting a yeast infection?

To reduce your chances of getting a yeast infection, you can reduce the amount of skin that’s exposed to the Candida fungus.

You can do this by:

  • Wearing loose or cotton underwear.
  • Wearing loose, cotton clothing.
  • Wearing loose, cotton tampons.
  • Avoid sharing personal items, such as razors or toothbrushes, with others.
  • Don’t use products that contain strong fragrances.

When should I call my doctor?

It’s important to see your doctor if you develop symptoms of a yeast infection.

Treatment for a yeast infection can reduce your chances of getting a systemic (whole body) infection.

You should also see your doctor if you develop a fever or rash.

Key points about yeast infections

  • A yeast infection is a type of infection caused by a fungus.
  • Candida is a type of fungus.
  • Some people who have a yeast infection will have symptoms that include a rash or a fever.
  • Yeast infections can affect any part of your body, including your vagina, anus, and mouth.
  • If left untreated, a yeast infection can cause an infection that can affect your entire body.
  • To reduce the risk of getting a yeast infection, you should reduce the amount of skin that’s exposed to the Candida fungus.

Last point

Check your symptoms to see if you might have a yeast infection. If you do, see your doctor.

If you think you have a yeast infection, see your doctor right away. Untreated yeast infections can be life-threatening.

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