Electric shock when sleeping

Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) is a treatment that uses electric currents to stimulate the brain and induce a seizure. ECT is used to treat certain mental health conditions, but it can also be used to treat sleep disorders.

Sleep researchers have found that repeated stimulation of the hippocampus, a part of the brain involved with memory, can increase the amount of time you spend in deep sleep.

One 2010 study suggests that repeated stimulation of the hippocampus may improve sleep quality.

Some people don’t experience any effects from ECT. This is called auras, which are temporary changes in behavior or perception.

A 2011 review of studies found that ECT can reduce seizure frequency in people with partial seizures. However, it doesn’t appear to improve long-term seizure control.

Electroconvulsive therapy can cause memory loss.

In a 2011 study, researchers found that ECT can cause memory loss in people with mood disorders.

ECT is also used to treat certain types of epilepsy.

There are several types of ECT. The most common is the bilateral ECT. This involves placing a person on a table with their head positioned in the same position for both treatments.

Other types of ECT include unilateral ECT, where the person receives one treatment with their head positioned in one position, and sequential unilateral ECT, where the person receives a series of treatments, with each treatment followed by a sleep recovery period.

This procedure can be repeated as often as needed.

You can’t use ECT to stop seizures or prevent epileptic seizures from occurring.

ECT is also used to treat certain mental health conditions. It’s sometimes used along with medications to treat people with depression and anxiety.

Researchers are still working to understand how ECT affects the brain and how it affects people’s mental health.

ECT can cause side effects.

In a 2016 study, researchers found that ECT can cause side effects in children. These can include:

  • Memory loss
  • Depression
  • Confusion
  • Anxiety

ECT can cause memory loss.

In a 2011 study, researchers looked at the effects of ECT on people’s memory. They found that memory loss was common after ECT.

Electroconvulsive therapy may be unsafe for children.

According to the American Academy of Sleep Medicine, ECT is considered safe for people under the age of 21. The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) recommends that ECT be used only after other treatments have been tried.

The FDA also states that ECT is safe for people over the age of 21 with no history of drug tolerance or drug dependence.

It’s also safe for people who have a history of convulsive seizures.

The FDA recommends that parents or caregivers not administer ECT to children as it can be unsafe.

People with epilepsy are at increased risk of developing ECT side effects.

You should contact your doctor if you’re thinking about receiving ECT.

If you receive ECT, you should also be prepared to have a seizure during the procedure.

You should call your doctor if you’re taking medications that can interact with ECT. These may include:

  • Benzodiazepines
  • Antidepressants
  • Anticonvulsants
  • Sodium valproate

There’s a risk of complications from ECT.

The risk is higher in people with previous seizures.

If you have a history of seizures, you may be at an increased risk of experiencing complications.

The risk of complications from ECT can include:

  • Allergic reactions
  • Drowsiness
  • Cognitive problems
  • Heart problems
  • Blood clots
  • Blood pressure changes
  • Seizures
  • Death

Who can receive electroconvulsive therapy?

You may be eligible for this treatment if you have a seizure disorder and you’re experiencing:

  • Seizures that are unresponsive to medications
  • Seizures that are difficult to control
  • Seizures that affect your daily life
  • Have no other treatment option for your seizures
  • Are aged 18 years or older
  • Are not pregnant or breastfeeding

If you’re interested in undergoing ECT, talk with your doctor.

If you’re interested in receiving ECT, you should also be prepared to have a seizure during the procedure.

How much does it cost?

There are several different types of ECT, and the cost for each varies.

The average cost of ECT in the United States is $10,000 to $30,000. It’s also worth noting that there are variations in costs depending on where you live.

What if I’m a minor?

You may be eligible for ECT if you’re a minor.

However, if you’re a minor, you’re considered to be an adult.

For this reason, a doctor may need to apply for your minor’s power of attorney. This will allow the doctor to administer ECT to you.

What are the risks?

Like any treatment, ECT may carry risks.

To help reduce the risk, you should discuss your options with your doctor.

If you decide to receive ECT, your doctor may ask you to abstain from certain medications for a period of time before the procedure.

Electroconvulsive therapy can cause side effects.

In a 2016 study, researchers looked at the effects of ECT on people’s memory. They found that memory loss was common after ECT.

This can be a side effect of ECT.

Electroconvulsive therapy doesn’t work on everyone.

For some people, ECT can cause seizures.

People who have had a history of seizures may be more likely to experience seizures after ECT.

If you’re considering ECT, talk with your doctor.

How to prepare?

Before receiving ECT, you should make sure you’re prepared. This includes:

  • Discuss the possible side effects of ECT with your doctor and ask for a list of these side effects.
  • Have a discussion with your doctor about the possible risks before the procedure.
  • Make sure to tell your doctor if you’re taking any medications that can interact with ECT.

You should also arrange transportation to and from the hospital.

How long does it take?

The average ECT treatment takes between 60 and 90 minutes.

The length of time you’re sedated will depend on your doctor’s guidelines.

What happens during ECT?

There are two types of ECT:

  • Bilateral
  • Unilateral

Both types of ECT involve placing a person on a table with their head positioned in the same position for the procedure.

The person may be given a series of ECT treatments.

The person may also be given a recovery period after the procedure.

Some people may need to be put under general anesthesia in order to receive ECT.

Once the procedure is over, the person will be taken to their recovery room.

They may receive a sedative to help them relax and go to sleep.

If they receive general anesthesia, the person will likely remain awake throughout the procedure.

The person may have a seizure during the procedure, but this is uncommon.

If the procedure is successful, you may be able to go home the same day.

If the procedure is not successful, or if you have any side effects, you may need to stay overnight.

The recovery period is usually 3 to 5 days.

What’s the recovery process like?

You may experience some symptoms of an allergic reaction after receiving ECT.

These symptoms may include:

  • Itching
  • Hives
  • Swelling of the tongue and throat
  • Nasal congestion

A person may also experience a headache and sore throat.

The symptoms may last for a few days.

However, most people don’t experience any side effects after ECT.

If you experience any side effects, they should resolve.

Your doctor will monitor you for side effects after the procedure.

You may be asked to take a blood test to check for effects.

The results of the blood test will be sent to your doctor.

What’s the cost?

The cost for ECT can vary depending on your location and the provider you choose.

The cost of ECT can be as high as $10,000.

The bottom line

Electroconvulsive therapy is a form of treatment for some psychiatric disorders. It’s used to treat certain types of epilepsy.

It can be used to treat certain mental health conditions, but research suggests that it can also cause memory loss and other side effects in people with mood disorders.

It’s considered safe for people under the age of 21; however, it’s not recommended for children or people with a history of epilepsy.

Images by Freepik

Generated by AI

0 0 votes
Article Rating
Subscribe
Notify of
guest
0 Comments
Inline Feedbacks
View all comments
0
Would love your thoughts, please comment.x
()
x