Bleeding from bottom part of ass cheek

If you have bleeding from the bottom part of your anus or from your rectum, you should seek medical advice.

A doctor can remove the cause of the bleeding and treat any underlying conditions.

Irritation

Irritation can result from a number of things.

Pains in the anal canal can lead to itching and skin irritation. This can lead to bleeding.

An anal fissure is a tear in the wall of the anal canal that leads to bleeding.

Anal fissures can affect people with diabetes or hemorrhoids.

Anal fissures are common in people over the age of 50, and they can be treated with a sclerotherapy injection.

Fissures that are chronic or that come back after treatment are most likely to be the result of hemorrhoids.

Perianal abscess

A perianal abscess is a collection of pus in the affected area. The area may be swollen, red, and may also have a foul odor.

Perianal abscesses are rare, but they can occur in people with diabetes, kidney disease, or if they have an anal fissure or hemorrhoid.

They are commonly treated with antibiotics.

Perianal fistula

A perianal fistula is a hole or tear in the wall of the anal canal that allows stool to leak out.

Perianal fistulas are common in people with diabetes, and they can be treated with surgery.

People with a perianal fistula may experience a number of symptoms, including:

  • Pain or burning in the anal area
  • Discharge from the anal area
  • A foul odor coming from the anal area

Perianal fistulas can be cured with surgery, but they’re more likely to be a result of a hemorrhoid.

Fistula in rectum

A fistula in the rectum is a tear or hole in the wall of the rectum that allows stool to leak out.

This is rare.

It can occur in people with a hemorrhoid or an anal fissure.

A fistula in the rectum can be treated with surgery.

Diagnosing the cause of bleeding

In most cases, a doctor can diagnose the cause of bleeding through a physical exam. They may also perform a rectal examination to check for signs of an anal fissure or hemorrhoids.

If you have bleeding from the anus, your doctor may also use a colposcope to examine your rectum.

They may ask you to spread some stool on a special slide with a camera. They may also use a colposcope to examine your rectum if you have a hemorrhoid.

If you have a perianal abscess, your doctor will probably use a CT scan to examine the affected area.

If they suspect you have a fistula, they may use a CT scan to examine your rectum.

Treating bleeding from the bottom part of the anal canal

Treatment for the underlying cause of the bleeding depends on the cause and severity of the bleeding.

Bleeding from an anal fissure or hemorrhoid can be treated with a topical pain reliever or a warm compress.

If your hemorrhoid is being treated with a topical cream, you may need to apply it twice a day.

For a perianal abscess, your doctor may give you a round of antibiotics. They may also prescribe a stool softener.

The use of a stool softener is most likely for people with frequent and chronic bleeding from the anus.

Treating a perianal abscess can be complex. Your doctor will need to determine the best course of treatment for you.

Treating a perianal fistula may involve surgery.

What are the complications of bleeding from the bottom part of the anal canal?

The most common complication of bleeding from the bottom part of the anal canal is anal fissures.

These can be a painful and long-term condition.

They can also cause scarring.

Diabetes can also lead to these fissures.

In some cases, anal fissures can develop into anal fistulas.

These fistulas can be difficult to treat and require significant medical attention.

A perianal abscess can also become a fistula.

A perianal fistula can cause rectal bleeding and may also lead to an abscess.

This may require surgery.

How long does bleeding from the bottom part of the anal canal last?

Some types of bleeding from the bottom part of the anal canal may not be cause for concern.

However, if you have bleeding for more than 2 weeks, see your doctor.

You should also see your doctor if:

  • You have blood in your stool for more than 2 weeks
  • You have a fever for more than 3 days
  • You have frequent rectal bleeding
  • Your blood pressure is low
  • You have frequent blood clots
  • You have blood in your urine

If you have any of these symptoms, you should see your doctor.

Your doctor may be able to diagnose the cause of the bleeding.

How to prevent bleeding from the bottom part of the anal canal?

The following steps can help you avoid or reduce anal bleeding:

  • Wear loose-fitting underwear.
  • Avoid tight clothing around your anus.
  • Avoid sitting for long periods of time.
  • Avoid straining during bowel movements.
  • Eat a diet that’s high in fiber.
  • Drink plenty of fluids.
  • Use a stool softener.

When to see a doctor?

See your doctor if you experience any of the following symptoms:

  • A fever of above 101.3 F (38 C) for more than 3 days
  • Blood in your urine
  • Blood or pus in your stool
  • Hemorrhoids that don’t improve with home treatment
  • Anal abscesses that aren’t healing
  • Rectal bleeding that lasts more than 2 weeks
  • Rectal bleeding that doesn’t improve with home treatment

How to manage bleeding from the bottom part of the anal canal at home?

The following steps can help you manage symptoms:

  • Drink plenty of fluids to prevent dehydration.
  • Avoid foods that are high in fiber.
  • Avoid spicy foods.
  • Apply a warm compress to the area.
  • Use an over-the-counter pain reliever.

What is the long-term outlook?

The outlook for people with bleeding from the bottom part of the anal canal depends on the cause of the bleeding.

For most people, the hemorrhoids and anal fissures will go away on their own.

People who have anal abscesses or anal fistulas may need surgery to treat them.

If the hemorrhoids are causing the bleeding, the hemorrhoidal veins can be surgically removed.

A perianal abscess can be treated with antibiotics. If the bacteria causing the abscess are resistant to antibiotics, your doctor may need to treat you with surgery.

The outlook for people with a perianal fistula depends on how severe the fistula is.

In some cases, you may need surgery to repair it.

Outlook

If the bleeding is a result of an anal fissure, you can treat it with a topical pain reliever or a warm compress.

If the bleeding is a result of a perianal abscess, you’ll need surgery.

Images by Freepik

Generated by AI

0 0 votes
Article Rating
Subscribe
Notify of
guest
0 Comments
Inline Feedbacks
View all comments
0
Would love your thoughts, please comment.x
()
x