Extreme boredom and mental health

Boredom can cause serious mental health complications. Boredom can interfere with attention, concentration, and memory.

In some cases, boredom can cause anxiety, depression, or stress. It can also worsen symptoms of schizophrenia and other mental health conditions.

Boredom can also lead to substance use. People with mental illness are more likely than others to misuse illicit drugs and alcohol.

Boredom can worsen addiction

The combination of boredom and addiction can cause anxiety and withdrawal symptoms. The experience of boredom and stress can intensify cravings for the substance.

Substance use can lead to other mental health issues, as well.

In some cases, a person has a strong desire for a substance, but they can’t get it. In other cases, a person has a substance use disorder but finds it difficult to quit.

In either case, boredom can worsen their addiction and their mental health symptoms.

Boredom can worsen symptoms of depression

People who use substances have a higher risk of depression. In some cases, depression is a symptom of substance use.

Depression can also cause symptoms of boredom, such as:

  • Fatigue
  • Feeling restless
  • Irritability
  • Sleep problems
  • Lack of motivation
  • Loss of appetite
  • Low self-esteem
  • Feelings of worthlessness

People with a substance use disorder have a higher risk of developing depression.

Depression can also cause feelings of hopelessness and worthlessness. Feeling hopeless and worthless can lead to feelings of sadness, hopelessness, and helplessness. These feelings, in turn, can cause boredom and anxiety.

Boredom and anxiety

Feelings of boredom can intensify feelings of anxiety, which can worsen symptoms of depression and other mental health conditions.

In some cases, anxiety and depression can occur concomitantly. This is known as anxiety and depression.

People with anxiety disorders are more likely to experience depression.

People with depression are more likely to experience anxiety.

Boredom and suicide

Substance use can increase feelings of hopelessness and low self-worth. It can also cause feelings of powerlessness or helplessness. As a result, people can feel hopeless and helpless and lose interest in life.

This can lead to thoughts of suicide and increased risk of suicide.

In some cases, people who are depressed or anxious may experience depression as a symptom of another mental health condition. For example, someone with anxiety may also have depression as a symptom of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD).

Suicide prevention

If you think someone is at immediate risk of self-harm or hurting another person:

  1. Stay with the person until help arrives.
  2. Remove any guns, knives, medications, or other things that may cause harm.
  3. Listen, but don’t judge, argue, threaten, or yell.

If you think someone is considering suicide:

  • Get help from a crisis or suicide prevention hotline.
  • If you aren’t in a safe place, call 911 or your local emergency number.
  • If the person is acting erratically, try to help them stay calm.

When to call the police?

If you or someone you know is feeling threatened, alone, or hopeless, call 911.

If you or someone you know is experiencing suicidal thoughts, call 911 or your local emergency number.

If you think someone is having a medical emergency, call your local emergency number, such as 911.

It’s also important to call the emergency number if you:

  • Are an adult or older teen with a mental health condition and need help managing it
  • Experience hallucinations or delusions
  • You have been drinking or using drugs
  • Have a physical health condition that could be exacerbated by anxiety or depression
  • Need help getting to a doctor or other health professional’s office or clinic
  • Need help finding a safe place to stay

How to get help?

If you or someone you know is experiencing symptoms of a mental health condition, such as:

  • Boredom
  • Anxiety
  • Depression
  • Suicidal ideation
  • Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD)

Do you think someone may be having thoughts of suicide?

If you think a loved one is experiencing a suicide risk, talk to them about it. Ask if there’s anything you can do to help.

It’s also important to tell your doctor if you or anyone close to you is experiencing:

  • Bored or anxious feelings
  • Feelings of hopelessness or helplessness
  • Feeling of powerlessness or helplessness
  • Thoughts of suicide

You can also call the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline at 8002738255 or the Crisis Text Line by texting HOME to 741741.

What to do if you need help?

If you or a loved one is experiencing symptoms of a mental health condition, talk to your doctor or other health care professional.

They’ll likely refer you to a mental health specialist, such as a psychologist or psychiatrist. They can help you manage your symptoms and develop a plan for treatment.

If you’re having thoughts of suicide, get help from a crisis or suicide prevention hotline.

You can also call 911 or your local emergency number.

If you’re in immediate danger, such as being near a fire, get help from someone nearby right away.

If you’re at a safe place, but you’re not sure if you’re safe, call 911 or your local emergency line.

If you’re having thoughts of suicide and are in a place where help is not available, call 911 or your local emergency hotline. You can also call your doctor or a suicide prevention hotline.

What to do if you’re getting help?

If you’re having thoughts of suicide, call 911 or your local emergency hotline right away.

You can also talk to a mental health professional or call the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline at 8002738255 or the Crisis Text Line by texting HOME to 7417041.

What to do if you’re in a place where help is not available?

Get help from someone nearby or call 911.

If you’re in a place where help is not available, get help from a crisis or suicide prevention hotline.

If you’re in a safe place, but you’re not sure if you’re safe, call 911 or your local emergency hotline.

If you’re not sure where you are, get help from a map or map apps.

The bottom line

Substance use is a risk factor for depression. It can also cause anxiety and other symptoms that can worsen depression and other mental health conditions.

Boredom is a symptom of depression and can worsen feelings of depression and anxiety. Boredom can also increase the risk of suicide.

Images by Freepik

Generated by AI

0 0 votes
Article Rating
Subscribe
Notify of
guest
0 Comments
Inline Feedbacks
View all comments
0
Would love your thoughts, please comment.x
()
x