Boots for swollen feet

If you have a foot infection, your doctor will prescribe shoes that fit very tightly. This can help prevent swelling or prevent your foot from rubbing against the shoe.

If you have a swollen foot, the best idea is to let your foot rest and allow it to drain. You can do this by taking an over-the-counter (OTC) pain reliever, such as ibuprofen (Advil), or other pain relievers, such as acetaminophen (Tylenol) or aspirin.

If you have a very swollen foot, you may be given a topical antibiotic, such as mupirocin (Maxidac). You can also use an OTC ointment, such as Neosporin, to help with the pain.

If the swollen foot is bothering you or causing you pain, your doctor may prescribe antibiotic cream or ointment. You can apply the medicine to the foot every day after washing it with a gentle soap and water.

Other options for swollen feet

If your doctor has prescribed an antibiotic, you can apply it to the foot every day after washing it with a gentle soap and water. This will help treat the infection and prevent it from spreading.

If the swelling goes away on its own, the condition may be resolved. However, if your foot still hurts, you may need to see your doctor to get an antibiotic prescription for treatment.

When to see a doctor?

See your doctor if you have a swollen foot and are experiencing any of the following symptoms:

  • Swelling that is getting worse
  • Pain that is severe or is stabbing
  • Sores or cuts on the foot

You should also see your doctor if the swelling has lasted for more than a few days or if the foot is hard or painful.

Be sure to let your doctor know if you’ve recently tried an OTC pain reliever or antibiotic ointment and the swelling is not going away.

Also, make sure to let your doctor know if you have a history of diabetes, rheumatoid arthritis, or other conditions that affect your feet.

Your doctor will need to know if you have any other medical conditions, such as diabetes, that may be contributing to your swollen foot. This can help your doctor determine the best treatment option.

What to expect from your doctor?

Your doctor will ask you several questions about your symptoms and medical history. Be ready to answer these questions as precisely as possible.

What kind of problem are we treating?

Your doctor will ask about your symptoms and medical history. Be ready to give your doctor as much information as you can.

What are the possible causes of this problem?

Your doctor will ask you about other conditions that may be contributing to the swelling.

Tell your doctor about all the medications you are taking, including vitamins and supplements.

What are the symptoms?

Be sure to describe the symptoms you are experiencing. This can help your doctor determine what is causing the problem.

Is the swelling painful?

Tell your doctor if the swelling is causing you pain.

How is the swelling affecting your day to day life?

Be specific when describing how the swelling is affecting your day to day life. Be aware that you may be asked to describe this in a way that is easier to understand for your doctor.

What are your concerns?

Be ready to answer questions about your concerns.

How should I care for my swollen foot?

You will need to change the bandage on your foot every day. This can help prevent the infection from spreading to other parts of your body.

You may be given other instructions on caring for your swollen foot. Discuss with your doctor what you should do.

What are the next steps?

Be sure to follow all of your doctor’s instructions and instructions that your doctor gives you. Don’t hesitate to ask questions if you have any.

Outlook (Prognosis) for swollen feet

Your outlook will depend on the underlying cause of the swelling.

If the swelling is caused by an infection, your outlook will depend on how well you respond to treatment.

A foot infection usually requires more than one course of treatment.

See your doctor if your foot is getting worse or if you have symptoms such as pain, swelling, or other changes.

What are possible complications of swollen feet?

Complications of a foot infection can include:

  • Infection spreading to other parts of the body
  • Infection that needs to be drained
  • Nerve damage

There are also some health complications that may be associated with foot swelling. These include:

  • Carpal tunnel syndrome
  • Tendonitis
  • Plantar fasciitis
  • Gangrene

Some people may experience a flare-up of a foot or leg problem over time. The exact cause of this can vary.

What are possible complications of diabetes?

People with diabetes are at risk for a number of complications of diabetes. These include:

  • Foot ulcers
  • Ulcerations
  • Neuropathy
  • Foot infections
  • Kidney disease
  • Eye problems
  • Hearing problems

If you have diabetes, you should see your doctor regularly. This will help you and your doctor monitor your condition.

Where can I learn more?

If you want more information about foot problems, the American Academy of Dermatology has a number of educational programs. Check out their website at aad.org to find more information.

If you want to learn more about diabetes, the American Diabetes Association has a number of educational programs.

The American Diabetes Association has a number of online resources at diabetes.org.

The American Academy of Pediatrics has a number of online resources as well.

The American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons has a number of online resources as part of their educational programs.

The bottom line

Sometimes, swollen feet are the result of an underlying medical condition. However, sometimes the cause is not known.

If the foot swelling is minor and not interfering with your day to day life, you should see your doctor to find out what is causing the swelling.

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