Machiavellianism personality disorder criteria

It is important to note that the personality disorder criteria for Machiavellianism is different from the criteria for other traits.

Machiavellianism does not have a specific diagnostic code, so it is listed as a separate disorder, not as a part of other personality disorders such as histrionic, which is a type of sociopathy.

The criteria for a diagnosis of Machiavellianism are:

  • Showing a pattern of manipulation, deception, or aggressive behavior
  • Having no remorse for the behavior
  • Having an inflated sense of self-importance
  • Not wanting to accept responsibility for the behavior
  • Having a need for power, control, and dominance
  • Having little regard for the feelings of others
  • Having a low tolerance for frustration
  • Showing a lack of empathy or concern for other people

Machiavellianism is classified as a personality disorder because it causes significant distress and impairment in social, occupational, or other important areas of an individual’s life.

A person with this personality disorder may have a lower self-esteem and a sense of powerlessness over their behavior.

This personality disorder may lead to the development of other mental health problems.

Machiavellianism personality disorder is not currently included in the fifth edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-5).

Diagnostic criteria

To be diagnosed with a personality disorder, the individual must show the presence of at least two of the following:

  • Persistent pattern of behavior in which people use deceptive strategies to achieve their own ends
  • A need for power, control, and dominance
  • A low tolerance for frustration
  • A lack of empathy or concern for other people
  • A sense of entitlement
  • A lack of regard for personal values and beliefs
  • A lack of remorse for the behavior

It is important to note that a diagnosis of Machiavellianism personality disorder does not require that a person shows any of the following:

  • An inflated sense of self-importance
  • A need for secrecy
  • A lack in empathy
  • A lack in remorse

However, if a person does not have any of these traits, this does not mean that they do not have a personality disorder.

According to the DSM-5, a diagnosis of the following personality disorders is required:

  • Antisocial personality disorder (ASPD)
  • Antisocial tendencies
  • Borderline personality disorder (BPD)
  • Bipolar disorder, manic-depressive type (hypomanic episode)
  • Paranoid personality disorder
  • Schizoid personality disorder
  • Histrionic personality disorder

A person with this disorder may also have an additional personality disorder.

What causes a personality disorder?

Personality disorders are considered to be a “biological” disorder, which is the result of a person’s genetics.

A person’s personality may be influenced by their environment, but this is not the same as a personality disorder.

What are common symptoms?

People with a personality disorder have a pattern of behavior that causes significant distress and impairment in social, occupational, or other important areas of their life.

The symptoms of a personality disorder may include:

  • Being unable to recognize a person’s feelings or emotions
  • Not being able to experience empathy for other people
  • Not feeling remorse for the behavior
  • Showing little regard for the feelings of others
  • Not feeling empathy for themselves
  • Having a sense of entitlement
  • Having a need for secrecy
  • Having a sense of power, control, and dominance
  • Lacking concern for the feelings of others
  • Having low self-esteem and feelings of powerlessness
  • Showing a lack of regard for personal values and beliefs
  • Showing a lack of remorse for the behavior
  • Showing signs of antisocial or other personality traits

What are the risk factors?

People who have a personality disorder may be at a higher risk for the following:

  • Substance abuse
  • Suicide
  • Poor health
  • Poor interpersonal relationships
  • Low self-esteem
  • Anger
  • Anger issues
  • Low self-control
  • Lack of impulse control

What are the types of personality disorders?

There are several types of personality disorders.

Antisocial personality disorder

This is a personality disorder that involves the following:

  • A pattern of behavior that involves preying on others to gain power and control
  • Preoccupation with power
  • A lack of concern for the feelings of others
  • A lack in empathy for others
  • A poor ability to recognize and understand the emotions of others
  • A need to be the center of attention

Antisocial personality disorder is also known as:

  • Borderline personality disorder
  • Antisocial personality disorder
  • Sociopathic personality disorder

Psychopathy

Psychopathy is a personality disorder that involves the following:

  • A pattern of behavior in which a person lies, cheats, or steals to gain power or control
  • A general lack of empathy for others
  • A lack or poor ability to understand and show empathy for others
  • A lack or poor ability to control their behavior
  • The need for secrecy
  • A tendency to be violent

Psychopathy is also known as:

  • Anti-social personality disorder
  • Sociopathy

Bipolar disorder, manic-depressive type

Bipolar disorder, manic-depressive type (also known as manic depression) is a condition that causes episodes of extreme mood changes. These may involve:

  • Extreme highs
  • Extreme lows
  • Very rapid shifts between the two

Bipolar disorder, manic-depressive type is a type of mood disorder that causes these extreme mood shifts.

If a person has bipolar disorder, manic-depressive type, they may have the following symptoms:

  • Extremely elevated moods
  • Extreme irritability
  • Extremely quick shifts in mood
  • Extreme agitation
  • Extreme restlessness
  • Very rapid shifts in mood
  • Extremely poor self-control
  • Extreme impulsivity
  • Extremely reduced need for sleep

How is a personality disorder diagnosed?

There are several ways to diagnose personality disorders. A doctor may ask a person about their past, present, and possible future.

They may also ask the person if they have a friend or family member with a personality disorder.

A person may also be asked about the symptoms they experience and whether or not they have been able to stop these behaviors.

It is important to note that some people may not recognize the symptoms of a personality disorder. This means that it is important to have a professional identify this condition.

Treatment for personality disorders

If a person has a personality disorder, they may be treated for the symptoms of the disorder.

The takeaway

A personality disorder is a type of mental illness that causes a person to have a pattern of behavior that causes significant distress in social, occupational, or other important areas of their life.

A person with a personality disorder may also have other conditions, such as bipolar disorder, manic-depressive type.

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