What is Gonorrhoea?

Gonorrhoea is an infection caused by the Gonorrhoea bacteria. Gonorrhoea is spread through sexual contact with an infected person. It is not spread from person to person.

Gonorrhoea can be spread from person to person through vaginal, anal and oral sex.

How is Gonorrhoea diagnosed?

The diagnosis of gonorrhoea is made by taking a sample of fluid from the cervix or another vaginal or rectal area. This sample is examined under a microscope to check for gonorrhoea bacteria. This test is often done as a screening test for sexually transmitted infections (STIs).

How is Gonorrhoea treated?

Gonorrhoea is a curable infection. Treatment for gonorrhoea involves taking oral antibiotics. Your doctor will prescribe the correct antibiotic for your infection.

It is important to take the full course of antibiotics to ensure that the infection is fully treated.

It is important to finish taking the full course of antibiotics to prevent the infection from returning.

Can Gonorrhoea be prevented?

Yes, Gonorrhoea can be prevented. However, there is no vaccine or treatment for Gonorrhoea.

How can I prevent Gonorrhoea?

The best way to prevent Gonorrhoea is to not have sex with someone who has an active infection with Gonorrhoea.

What is the difference between gonorrhoea and chlamydia?

Gonorrhoea and chlamydia share some common symptoms and can be spread through sex. However, unlike gonorrhoea, chlamydia is not a sexually transmitted infection.

How do I get tested?

You can go to your GP or a sexual health clinic for a sexual health test. You can also book an appointment with a sexual health clinic here.

How do I know I have Gonorrhoea?

It is important to know you are not at risk of getting Gonorrhoea. You may have Gonorrhoea if you:

  • Have sexual intercourse without a condom or other barrier method.
  • Are diagnosed with Gonorrhoea and/or chlamydia.
  • Have Gonorrhoea symptoms and have sex with someone who has Gonorrhoea.

How do I know I have chlamydia?

You may have chlamydia if you:

  • Have symptoms of chlamydia.
  • Have sex without a condom or other barrier method.
  • Have sex with someone who has chlamydia.

What are the symptoms of Gonorrhoea?

Some men and women may not have any symptoms if the infection has been passed on through skin to skin contact. However, some men and women may have symptoms of Gonorrhoea. These symptoms may include:

  • A burning sensation when urinating.
  • A painful or burning sensation during sex.
  • A discharge that is green in colour and lasts for up to 6 weeks.

Symptoms of Gonorrhoea may also include:

  • Painful urination.
  • Pain when having sex.
  • A rash or sores on the penis or vagina.
  • A painful or burning sensation in the testicles.
  • Abdominal pain.
  • Painful or frequent urination.
  • Pain during sex.
  • A discharge that is green in colour.

How common is Gonorrhoea?

Gonorrhoea is a common infection. Around 1.3 Million new cases of Gonorrhoea are diagnosed each year in the UK.

How common is chlamydia?

Chlamydia is a common infection. Around 6 million new cases of chlamydia are diagnosed each year in the UK.

Who is most at risk of Gonorrhoea?

Anyone can have Gonorrhoea. However, some people are at greater risk of the infection compared to others. Risk factors that make you more likely to be infected include:

  • Having unprotected sex with multiple people, particularly if you have not used a condom or other barrier method.
  • Having a partner who has a urinary tract infection.
  • Having unprotected sex with someone who has an STI.
  • Using a condom and/or other barrier method during sex.
  • Having sex with multiple partners.
  • Being a man.
  • Having a penis.
  • Having a vagina.
  • Having a penis that is uncircumcised.
  • Having multiple sexual partners.

How common is chlamydia in men?

Chlamydia is a common infection in men. Around 1 in 20 men are diagnosed with chlamydia each year in the UK.

How common is chlamydia in women?

Chlamydia is a common infection in women. Around 1 in 100 women are diagnosed with chlamydia each year in the UK.

Do I need to be concerned about Gonorrhoea or chlamydia?

You do not need to be concerned about these infections. It is common for both conditions to be passed on through sex.

How do I stop Gonorrhoea or Chlamydia from spreading?

You should not have unprotected sex with anyone who has an active infection.

You should also not use a condom or other barrier method during sex with a person who has an active infection with Gonorrhoea or chlamydia.

How do I know if I have an STI?

You do not need to be concerned about an STI. It is common for an STI to be passed on through sex.

What should I do if I think I have an STI?

If you think you have an STI contact your GP or sexual health clinic as soon as possible. You will be advised to go to your GP or sexual health clinic for an STI test.

What is the best course of action for Gonorrhoea or chlamydia?

The best course of action for Gonorrhoea or chlamydia is to seek medical advice and treatment as soon as possible.

There is no cure for Gonorrhoea or chlamydia. However, Gonorrhoea and chlamydia can be cured. This is usually done by taking oral antibiotics.

What is the best way to prevent an STI?

The best way to prevent an STI is to use a condom or other effective barrier method during sex.

The best way to treat an STI is to treat it as quickly as possible.

How can I get tested for STIs?

You can book an appointment with a sexual health clinic here.

Can I get tested for chlamydia or gonorrhoea in the UK?

Yes, UK residents can have chlamydia or gonorrhoea tested for free in the UK. This is sometimes called STD screening or a chlamydia test.

Finally

If you would like to know more about Gonorrhoea or chlamydia, then you can check out our FAQ page. You can also visit our online support centre for more information. Our doctors and nurses are available to help answer any questions you have.

This information is also available in other languages.

Images by Freepik

Generated by AI

0 0 votes
Article Rating
Subscribe
Notify of
guest
0 Comments
Inline Feedbacks
View all comments
0
Would love your thoughts, please comment.x
()
x